Results of Coast to Coast to Coast Portfolio Competition

Results of Coast to Coast to Coast Portfolio Competition

Michael and I have now completed our consideration of work submitted for Coast to Coast to Coast's first competition.

Many congratulations to the two poets who will have work published between hand stitched covers in limited edition journals, and to three poets each to have 2 poems in Issue 4 or Issue 5 of Coast to Coast to Coast. 

Runners up are:

Molly Vogel;

Russell Jones,

William Daunt


Winners are: 

 

Jane Lovell for her portfolio, Forbidden

Rebecca Gethin for her portfolio Messages

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Copies of issue 2 of Coast to Coast to Coast Journal

Michael and I launched issue 2 of Coast to Coast to Coast on December 19th at Open Eye Gallery in Liverpool. The journal contains the new work of 20 poets* including a beautiful new poem by John Glenday. 

Each stitched journal is created individually and numbered. Issue 1 of the journal has sold out. 

A limited  number of copies of Issue 2 are available from Coast2journal@gmail.com   Payments (£9 plus £1 wrapping and postage) can be made by Paypal to mariax.b@gmail.com

 

* John Glenday, Marjorie Lotfi Gill, Charles Lauder, Jr, David Coldwell

Rebecca Gethin, Ken Evans, Suzannah V. Evans, Pippa Little

Pauline Rowe, Stephanie Conn, Paul Stephenson, Finola Scott

Breda Wall Ryan, Martin Bewick, Robin Houghton, Mary Noonan

John Foggin, Malcolm Terry, Frank Dullaghan, Jeffa Kay

 

 

 

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Coast to Coast to Coast: a new Poetry journal

We wanted to create a journal which was different to other poetry journals and magazines we admire and have subscribed to, and also wanted the journal to be a small piece of art in itself.

Coast to Coast to Coast will be launched at Open Eye Gallery, Liverpool on Thursday August 17th where contributors to the journal, including Katharine Towers, John Foggin, Julie Hogg, and Will Daunt will read from their work. 

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Coast to Coast to Coast launch August 17 2017

Coast to Coast to Coast launch August 17 2017

Coast to Coast to Coast, a hand stitched poetry journal with fabric cover will launch in Liverpool. The journal, which aims to be as much a piece of art as a poetry journal without the art or poetry being compromised came out of ideas I’d been working on with Michael during the time we were writing, reading and running some workshops in galleries on Merseyside.

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Commissioned by the BBC for National Poetry Day

Commissioned by the BBC for National Poetry Day

Here I am reading The Ferry on the Mersey, my poem commissioned by the BBC for National Poetry day. Listen here.

About the initiative: "From Season of mists to golden daffodils; Robbie Burns to Roger McGough and songs to limericks. Each year on National Poetry Day we celebrate all things in verse whether they rhyme or not. This year, as part of a nationwide campaign, we've teamed up with local poets around the country to celebrate where we live in verse." 

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INTERVIEW: Sandeep Parmar

INTERVIEW: Sandeep Parmar

I interviewed Sandeep Parmar for The Honest Ulsterman. 

Sandeep Parmar was born in England and raised in Southern California. A poet and a critic, specialising in modernist women's writing, she received her PhD from University College London and her MA in Creative Writing from the University of East Anglia. Her books include: Reading Mina Loy’s Autobiographies: Myth of the Modern Woman (Bloomsbury), a scholarly edition of the Collected Poems of Hope Mirrlees (Carcanet) and the Selected Poems of Nancy Cunard (Carcanet), and two books of her own poetry: The Marble Orchard and Eidolon (Shearsman). Her essays and reviews have appeared in the Guardian, Poetry Review, The Times Literary Supplement, The Los Angeles Review of Books, the Financial Times and the Times Higher Education. She is currently writing a novel partly about India’s Green Revolution and hybridised wheat, for which she has received an International Artist’s Development Fund Grant from the Arts Council/British Council. She is a BBC New Generation Thinker, a curator of the 2016 Liverpool Biennial and Co-Director of the University of Liverpool's Centre for New and International Writing where she is Senior Lecturer in English Literature.

Read the interview here

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Bridport Prize Competition: Shortlisted

Bridport Prize Competition: Shortlisted

I have been shortlisted in the Bridport Prize Poetry Competition. 

The mission of the Bridport Prize is to encourage emerging writers and it aims to, amongst other things, launch and promote new writing, provide opportunities for all through open submission and to explore and develop new opportunities for writers. 

See the whole shortlist here

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REVIEW: Myth as a Source in Irish Poetry – The Hidden Word of Poetry by Adam Wyeth

REVIEW: Myth as a Source in Irish Poetry – The Hidden Word of Poetry by Adam Wyeth

First Published in Orbis 169
he Hidden Word of Poetry by Adam Wyeth.
147pp, Salmon Poetry, Cliffs of Moher, County Clare, Ireland

Adam Wyeth’s book, The Hidden World of Poetry, comprising sixteen accessible but detailed essays, aims to showcase Ireland’s leading contemporary poetry, serve as a primer to analyse poems in depth, and to explore Celtic mythology’s exciting and popular heroes, gods and folktales.

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Elbow Room Competition: Placed 3rd

Elbow Room Competition: Placed 3rd

Dual came 3rd in the Poetry category of the annual Elbow Room Prize.

The Elbow Room Prize night will be hosted at the Roz Barr Architects Gallery on November 19th. Full details will be announced soon and the prize anthology is available to pre-order.

Elbow Room, launched in 2012 by As Yet Untitled, is an on-going series of art journals and live events celebrating art in all guises. Each volume of Elbow Room is individually curated to create a cohesive collection that includes written and visual arts. Produced in limited edition, hand bound pamphlets Elbow Room is sold online, in specialist bookshops and at artists’ book fairs across the country. Elbow Room is housed in multiple special collections including The Poetry Library at London’s Southbank Centre and The Scotland National Gallery.

Read more here.

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REVIEW: The Magnitude of My Sublime Existence by Selima Hill

REVIEW: The Magnitude of My Sublime Existence by Selima Hill

The Magnitude of My Sublime Existence by Selima Hill,  80pp, £9.95, Bloodaxe Books, Bloodaxe Books Ltd, Eastburn, South Park, Hexham, Northumberland NE46 1BS

The day The Magnitude of My Sublime Existence arrived I glanced at the first poem but found the poetry so compelling, I couldn’t escape, and read to the end.

Although many of the sixty-four poems, almost entirely in couplets, are full of encounters with doctors, nurses, inpatients and a menagerie of creatures, they explore isolation and powerlessness, but also a scrabble for power and a sense of determination.

The compact, succinct, vivid poems give the arresting sense of being incarcerated alongside the narrator. Despite the emotions aroused, through the writer’s eyes I became objective and rational, and found myself observing, gathering evidence and facts in an attempt to become normal, and so be released.

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Clockwork Donald

An excerpt from Clockwork Donald                                                              

                                                                       

Bridget looked out of the window of her dad’s house. It was years since she’d lived there and now that her dad had died, it would soon be sold. She could see the man who lived opposite through the fencing around his neutral toned house. You couldn’t miss him. His boots looked too big for him, his body looked lightweight with age but his stomping up and down the front lawn of his house reminded Bridget of how fearsome he could be. He had a name plaque on his gate – no one else in the street had one –  ‘Doone’, it said. Bridget read it without her glasses the first time she saw it, and thought it said Do one. That was kind of fitting. He was a miserable beggar. Bridget remembered when his children lived at home. He’d driven them away pretty quickly- no surprise there. She remembered his daughter, Sandra, telling her that her dad had to have his tea on the table at exactly a quarter to five, or there was trouble. Bridget didn’t like to imagine the trouble. There were stories about him using his belt to smack Sandra’s brothers. Bridget didn’t know about Sandra, whether she was smacked or not. Sandra never said. She was the middle one, got pregnant at sixteen, and left home for good.

 

Published in Shift Lit, Derry 2016

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